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25/11/2012

"Once when I was younger I went out and sat under the sky and looked up and asked it to take me back. What I should have done was gone to the swamp and bog and ask them to bring me back because, if anything is, mud and marsh are the origins of life. Now I think of the storm that made chaos, that the storm opened a door. It tried to make over a world the way it wanted it to be. At school I learned that storms create life, that lightning, with its nitrogen, is a beginning; bacteria and enzymes grow new life from decay out of darkness and water. It’s into this that I want to fall, into swamp and mud and sludge and it seems like falling is the natural way of things; gravity needs no fuel, no wings. It needs only stillness and waiting and time."

Linda Hogan // 4 ♥ // 1 year ago // Reblog // open this post on a new window >>

Met Keith and Chanda this Thanksgiving; they brought over fresh alligator gumbo to share to Amelie’s house. They’d frozen their negatives immediately after Katrina. These haunting effects are the miraculous result. I’d categorize this as walking on water.

picturedept:

Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick, Right to Return, River Road, NOLA Now!

Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick have spent most of their life living in and making documentary work about New Orleans. Both were born and raised in the Lower Ninth Ward, and much of their 30+ years of collaboration comes out of this shared community experience. Their archives, and the body of this work were tragically all too connected to the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans – though they had stored the work sealed tight and on high ground upon their evacuation, they returned to discover that flooding had destroyed nearly everything.

As the city recovered, so too did their work. Taking negatives from this damaged collection, Calhoun and McCormick have made a new body of work that literally captures the moment when the levees broke. In spite of the horrors of this event, the colorful and wordless abstraction of this process suggests a way forward, and a hope for the return of lost beauty.

Right to Return, River Road, NOLA Now! is curated by Shannon Brunette in partnership with L9 Center for the Arts in New Orleans.

A reception and toast with the artists will take place this Thursday, June 21, from 6 – 8 PM. Photo ID is required for entry.

Lambent Foundation
55 Exchange Place, Suite 406 New York, NY 10005

The exhibition will be on view through December 21, but please note that it is by appointment (contact info@lambentfoundation.org) and photo ID is required for entry.

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14/11/2012

"Say the thing that everyone knows no one should say. Say it anyway."

Jen Lemen, HOW TO BE DANGEROUS // 0 ♥ // 1 year ago // Reblog // open this post on a new window >>

When one speaks of the winds of change and ‘walking on water’ it’s too easy to refer to larger-than-life saints and sages for examples.
What about a six-year-old girl? What about YOU?

"In Spring 1960, Ruby Bridges was one of several black children in New Orleans to take a test to determine which children would be the first to attend integrated schools… The court-ordered first day of integrated schools in New Orleans, November 14, 1960, was commemorated by Norman Rockwell in the painting The Problem We All Live With. As Bridges describes it, “Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.” Former United States Deputy Marshal Charles Burks later recalled, “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all very proud of her.”
As soon as Bridges got into the school, white parents went in and brought their own children out; all teachers refused to teach while a black child was enrolled. They hired Barbara Henry, from Boston, Massachusetts, to teach Bridges, and for over a year Mrs. Henry taught her alone, “as if she were teaching a whole class.” That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal’s office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her; because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, only allowed Ruby to eat food that she brought from home. Another woman at the school put a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and protested with it outside the school, a sight that Bridges Hall has said “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.” At her mother’s suggestion, Bridges began to pray on the way to school, which she found provided protection from the comments yelled at her on the daily walks.” - excerpted from Wikipedia

Also from Marian Wright Edelman’s story on Ruby (via Huffington Post):  Ruby astonished her teacher one day when she asked Ruby why she had paused and talked to the crowd of white adults that morning, and Ruby responded, “I wasn’t talking. I was praying. I was praying for them.”
AND: “You cannot look at a person and tell whether they’re good or bad. Evil comes in all shades and colors. That is the lesson that I learned from the teacher that looked exactly like the people outside that threw things, spit, and yelled — she looked exactly like them, but she was different, and I knew that at six years old, because she showed me her heart.”

When one speaks of the winds of change and ‘walking on water’ it’s too easy to refer to larger-than-life saints and sages for examples.

What about a six-year-old girl? What about YOU?

"In Spring 1960, Ruby Bridges was one of several black children in New Orleans to take a test to determine which children would be the first to attend integrated schools… The court-ordered first day of integrated schools in New Orleans, November 14, 1960, was commemorated by Norman Rockwell in the painting The Problem We All Live With. As Bridges describes it, “Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.” Former United States Deputy Marshal Charles Burks later recalled, “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all very proud of her.”

As soon as Bridges got into the school, white parents went in and brought their own children out; all teachers refused to teach while a black child was enrolled. They hired Barbara Henry, from Boston, Massachusetts, to teach Bridges, and for over a year Mrs. Henry taught her alone, “as if she were teaching a whole class.” That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal’s office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her; because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, only allowed Ruby to eat food that she brought from home. Another woman at the school put a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and protested with it outside the school, a sight that Bridges Hall has said “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.” At her mother’s suggestion, Bridges began to pray on the way to school, which she found provided protection from the comments yelled at her on the daily walks.” - excerpted from Wikipedia

Also from Marian Wright Edelman’s story on Ruby (via Huffington Post):  Ruby astonished her teacher one day when she asked Ruby why she had paused and talked to the crowd of white adults that morning, and Ruby responded, “I wasn’t talking. I was praying. I was praying for them.

AND: “You cannot look at a person and tell whether they’re good or bad. Evil comes in all shades and colors. That is the lesson that I learned from the teacher that looked exactly like the people outside that threw things, spit, and yelled — she looked exactly like them, but she was different, and I knew that at six years old, because she showed me her heart.

// 2 &hearts; // 1 year ago // <a href='http://www.tumblr.com/reblog/35638775162/Gy68q4Dj' target='_blank' class='reblog'>Reblog</a> // <a class='open-post' href='http://pennyforyourcharms.tumblr.com/post/35638775162/ruby-bridges' target='_blank'>open this post on a new window>></a>
explore-blog:

“Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.” Neil Gaiman’s 8 rules of writing.

explore-blog:

“Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.” Neil Gaiman’s 8 rules of writing.

// 384 &hearts; // 1 year ago // <a href='http://www.tumblr.com/reblog/35638379990/FUDNBm54' target='_blank' class='reblog'>Reblog</a> // <a class='open-post' href='http://pennyforyourcharms.tumblr.com/post/35638379990/oya-agrees-neil-gaiman-keep-moving' target='_blank'>open this post on a new window>></a>

Tired of Speaking Softly by Hafiz

Tired of Speaking Softly by Hafiz

13/11/2012



Love wants to reach out and manhandle us,
Break all our teacup talk of God.

If you had the courage and
Could give the Beloved His choice, some nights,
He would just drag you around the room
By your hair,
Ripping from your grip all those toys in the world
That bring you no joy.

Love sometimes gets tired of speaking sweetly
And wants to rip to shreds
All your erroneous notions of truth

That make you fight within yourself, dear one,
And with others,

Causing the world to weep
On too many fine days.

God wants to manhandle us,
Lock us inside of a tiny room with Himself
And practice His dropkick.

The Beloved sometimes wants
To do us a great favor:
Hold us upside down
And shake all the nonsense out.

But when we hear
He is in such a “playful drunken mood”
Most everyone I know
Quickly packs their bags and hightails it
Out of town.

- Hafiz from The Gift translated by Daniel Ladinsky

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4 ♥ // REBLOG
Who&#8217;s and Why&#8217;s &#8212; the backstory of this pop-up art project.
ART CREDITS: &#8220;Lightning: Up close and personal," by David Kingham via Flickr.

Who’s and Why’s — the backstory of this pop-up art project.

ART CREDITS: “Lightning: Up close and personal," by David Kingham via Flickr.

// 1 &hearts; // 1 year ago // <a href='http://www.tumblr.com/reblog/35586801849/9pJl5AJx' target='_blank' class='reblog'>Reblog</a> // <a class='open-post' href='http://pennyforyourcharms.tumblr.com/post/35586801849/lightning-up-close-and-personal' target='_blank'>open this post on a new window>></a>
Nice serendipity. First thing up on Tumblr dashboard as I finish writing about John Cage and the winds of change. (via writersbloqinc, kari-shma)

Nice serendipity. First thing up on Tumblr dashboard as I finish writing about John Cage and the winds of change. (via writersbloqinc, kari-shma)

// 134 &hearts; // 1 year ago // <a href='http://www.tumblr.com/reblog/35585520074/qTxpLm07' target='_blank' class='reblog'>Reblog</a> // <a class='open-post' href='http://pennyforyourcharms.tumblr.com/post/35585520074/be-open-to-whatever-comes-next-john-cage' target='_blank'>open this post on a new window>></a>

10/11/2012

"

Cherish your visions; cherish your ideals; cherish the music that stirs in your heart, the beauty that forms in your mind, the loveliness that drapes your purest thoughts. Out of them will grow all delightful conditions, all heavenly environment. Of them, if you but remain true to them, your world will at last be built.

… Dream lofty dreams, and as you dream, so shall you become. Your vision is the promise of what you shall one day be; your ideal is the prophecy of what you shall at last unveil.

"

James Allen, As a Man Thinketh (from the expression, “As a man thinketh, so is he”) // 1 ♥ // 1 year ago // Reblog // open this post on a new window >>